Saturday, 16 November 2013

Food Prices Past, Present and Future

chart

Food Prices Past, Present and Future

Having kept notes, I thought you might be interested in seeing my price comparisons. The average price increase in foodstuffs since 1999 to 2013, when comparing my 'shopping list' of cheapest available items, amounts to almost exactly 100% But of course this only holds true if you have easy, cost-free access to a modern, all singing, all dancing supermarket…

… But what does this mean in real terms to the supermarket shoppers of today? We keep on ploughing our energy, time and money into making ends meet, while feeding the household and saving what we can, in the hope that the sun shines and we don't have to afford too many rainy days. - Read more

11 comments:

  1. How very interesting. I did keep some of the prices for rationed food when I was shopping back then. Looking at your prices above, pasta seems to have dropped in price. Is the price for the bread for home made bread? I have never seen a loaf that cheap in the shops.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The current prices have been taken from the website at mysupermarket.co.uk as I have no other way of checking them from here. The site now includes Aldi as well as the Asda, Sainsburys, Tesco, Waitrose etc so it's a handy tool to use. Sadly, it highlights how ridiculously cheap everything is in such places and probably the reason so many people find it acceptable to throw away perfectly good food. They'd probably think twice about it if they had nothing more than a village store for their grocery shopping.

      Delete
  2. Corned beef and tuna used to be such an affordable lunch - it's so expensive now

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Agreed. I was tempted to add in current village store prices to show what it costs us here, but they are so far removed from the supermarkets that I suspect they wouldn't have been believed.

      I may, yet, add them in, just to show folks the reality of rural living.

      Delete
  3. I dread to think how much you would pay at the village shop for that lot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm going to hazard a guess at around £20.00 but will get the exact prices next time I'm there.

      Delete
  4. Thanks for supplying all those interesting figures, which help to make sense of where we find ourselves.
    Gill

    ReplyDelete
  5. Very interesting post. A few years ago (in 2009 or 2010 - I think) I started recording my expenses but more as a way for me to keep track of where the money went. By the second year of recording I had already noted a significant increase in certain items. Sad to say (considering how old I was at the time) but this was the first time that I felt a direct connection to the "cost of living" discussions. I am thankful that I could still afford to pay for groceries etc. without it affecting me that much. But I also cook most of my food (thankfully know how to). Can't imagine what the cost increases are for those who can't, don't or won't.

    Please post on village prices when you have a chance.

    ~Pru

    ReplyDelete
  6. Do add the village prices please.

    ReplyDelete
  7. To all who have asked, I will add in the local (to me) prices as soon as I have them all. Having only local village stores here makes shopping extortionate, hence the reason I need to rely heavily on companies like Musclefood, Approved and Amazon groceries while stocking up on anything else on the rare occasion I am travelling further afield and can access a proper supermarket.

    ReplyDelete

Many thanks for taking the time to comment. All comments are moderated to help prevent system abuse by spammers, time-wasters and chancers, so your comment will not appear until it has been manually accepted for publishing. This will be done as soon as possible - I check for updates regularly. We are on GMT - London times.