Saturday, 28 September 2013

How to Make Thermal Velux Type Blinds on a Budget (Part 2)

 

It’s all pink ruffles and bling, but it fills the gap, opens during the day and supports the thermal window blanket (or quilt) sufficiently to help keep in the heat.

It has already been referred to as my ‘Bollywood’ blind but I think my favourite name, so far, is the gypsy blind. You could, of course, just hem on single piece of material to use as your blind – even an old pillow slip provides sufficient fabric to do that, but I wanted to be a little bit ‘different’, adding a bit of flamboyancy to Frugaldom to reflect the fact that frugal living is a very colourful and far from boring lifestyle.

It cost nothing to make, although I did spend a few pounds buying the spring-loaded extendable curtain rods. These are so much better than having to screw into the window frames.

Read part 2 of ‘How to Make Thermal Velux Type Blinds on a Budget’ HERE

8 comments:

  1. Looks very good and is also very practical into the bargain. Do you think that you might get mould on the blanket/quilt by the end of winter? I only ask as last winter we really restricted out heating so the bedrooms were cold most of the time and one curtain liner did get a little mouldy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Got that covered. As per blog post part 1, I made the blanket cover for the bubble wrap thermal part removable, so it can get taken off and popped into the washing machine anytime. :)

      Delete
  2. I like your blind. I think it's cool and quirky! Hey, age doesn't matter a jot, it's only numbers after all :D
    Your view looks amazing!!

    Rw

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks RW. There are a couple of houses can be see across the field. If I hang out the window, I can see right across the bay to the Isle of Man. :)

      Delete
  3. I love it!! So pretty and shiny. And practical too :-)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks, Ali. They have made such a difference to the room, especially when the sun shines through them in the morning - very bright and colourful. I haven't needed to use the thermal liner yet, as it hasn't really got cool enough at nights.

    ReplyDelete
  5. What a great idea! I would never have thought I could make a blind for a window like this, one of those things that makes so much sense....once you know how to do it. Something I will pass onto my mum as she has a window like this x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Stacey you can make just a simple, single strip to got between the two rods - very quick and easy for the thermal fleece during winter and then just change it for a lighter one during summer. I'm told I should make a black-out blind during summer, though, so I get enough hours of darkness to keep up the natural melatonin levels in the same way we need sunlight to keep up our vitamin D. Not sure how scientific this is but it sounds plausible.

      Delete

Many thanks for taking the time to comment. All comments are moderated to help prevent system abuse by spammers, time-wasters and chancers, so your comment will not appear until it has been manually accepted for publishing. This will be done as soon as possible - I check for updates regularly. We are on GMT - London times.